A simple backup strategy

Today i scanned several of my university lecture notes into PDF format. The ScanSnap document scanner makes this a very fast and easy process, and it includes text recognition. This feels good: i can save physical space by throwing away my notes, but still have them usefully available to me, in searchable format! yay!

Now that i’ve scanned these, i want to be sure that i don’t lose them. I’ve never been much of a person for backups, to be honest. My idea of a backup is something i do just before i upgrade Linux! But i’ve started to think i’d like to get into at least semi-regular backing up.

With that in mind, i came across this article: What’s Your Backup Strategy? by Jeff Atwood. The proposed solution works on Linux! Funny, i always assumed rsync was a ruby library: turns out it’s a straightforward command line tool.

sudo rsync -vaxE --delete --ignore-errors /home/aimee /media/FREECOM\ HDD/

That was enough to get me a first backup onto an external hard drive. Now it’s just a case of running that periodically to keep it up to date.

I’m not particularly interested in having a cron job because my computer isn’t always on, and the external drive isn’t always plugged in. So i just made myself a simple executable file to sit on the desktop and remind me to click it and synchronise the backup every so often.

#!/bin/bash

source=/home/aimee
target=/media/FREECOM\ HDD/

echo Backing up $source to $target
read -p "Press enter to begin."
sudo rsync -vaxE --delete --ignore-errors "$source" "$target"
read -p "Press enter to close."

See, i said it was simple! But a simple solution is better than no backup solution at all, right? :) Now that i’ve started with something i can tweak it as i find necessary.

By the way, i love the quote of Jeff’s in that article: The universe tends toward maximum irony. Don’t push it.

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