aimee’s 2011 retrospective – a year in review

This is going to be a long post, all about me! feel free to skip it! :)

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Celebrating a fantastic Code Retreat day

Today, Saturday 7th May 2011, there were six code retreats around the world! They were in Belgium, Spain, UK, USA, and two in Romania! We all did the same challenge: implementing Conway’s Game of Life in pairs, using test-driven development, in iterations of 45 minutes, discarding code at the end of every iteration and pairing with somebody different for the next iteration. We introduced a few extra challenges in every session! ;)

I co-facilitated the code retreat at Sheffield University. We had 18 participants: a good mix of computer science students, professional programmers, people who code for fun, and someone who seemed to have been dragged along but got thoroughly stuck into solving the problem along with everyone else! :)

Tom Crayford co-facilitated with me, and Chris Murray ran around making sure everything went extremely smoothly.

Code Retreat Sheffield - Coding

In iteration 1 we gave everyone chance to explore the problem without heckling to see how they would do. The only special challenge was to pair with someone they didn’t know. In the retrospective we talked about the languages and classes used.

For iteration 2 we talked about TDD as in, letting the tests really drive the code in the direction they want to go. We challenged people to do the very simplest thing they could possibly do at each stage. Many people found themselves writing unnecessary code, so we kept bringing them back to the rules of the game. The retrospective brought up questions of where to start, and whether a cell should be responsible for its own state, or whether a separate entity should know where all the cells are.

In iteration 3 we encouraged people to try a different starting point, to see how that worked. We stipulated that the code could not contain any booleans, like true or false or strings or numbers representing boolean states. The third iteration was sneakily only 30 minutes long, which we didn’t tell anyone until after the retrospective! There was a good discussion about using a grid to hold the cells, versus having an array of cells who know their coordinate position.

Code Retreat Sheffield - Skype link to Timisoara

Throughout the day, at various points, we were able to have Skype video calls with other code retreats. We found this very enjoyable: we discussed the different implementation options with other people who were also tackling the same problems. During the day, Sheffield managed to communicate with all the other code retreats: Valladolid in Spain, Cronos in Belgium, Bucharest and Timisoara in Romania, and finally, towards the end of our day, Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, USA, just as they were at the end of their second iteration.

Code Retreat Sheffield - live updates!

We also had two projectors constantly showing the twitter #coderetreat hashtag on tweetviz.com and a slideshow of pictures on hashalbum.com. These things really helped us to feel connected to a bigger community of people sharing a similar experience at the same time.

Code Retreat Sheffield - Lunch

After lunch we introduced Keith Braithwaite’s TDD as if you meant it and for iteration 4 we challenged people to obey the strict structure given. The purpose of this was to really break everyone’s normal processes to avoid mental shortcuts. It really ensures that the solution is exactly what the tests require, and nothing more. It was a tough challenge but it was taken well. A lot of people found they came to a better solution when these restrictions were applied.

In iteration 5 nobody was allowed to use if statements. (Or case statements, ternary operators, etc.) We also focussed on ping pong pair programming. This is where one person writes the test, the other person writes just enough code to make it pass, then writes the next test and hands back. During the day i had seen a lot of rather uneven pairing, where one person was doing most of the work, and the other was mostly just watching and commenting. Ping pong helps to address that by bouncing back equally between the two. Comments in the retrospective were that you had to concentrate harder, and felt more engaged because of it. I was surprised that many people had not paired that way before.

Iteration 6 was the last one for us. (Unlike Valladolid who went on to 8 iterations!) We gave people a bit longer and told them to just enjoy this one. The restrictions were that no method could be more than 3 lines long, and the code you wrote had to be the best you could possibly do. You had to write something you could be totally proud of. For most people, they said their code wasn’t the best they could possibly do, but they were definitely proud of it! :)

Code Retreat Sheffield - Retrospective

At the end of the day we did a raffle. Entry to the raffle was by way of a donation to Bletchley Park, for which we raised £200. Names were shuffled in a Ruby array and winners received either a copy of Apprenticeship Patterns or a software craftsmanship motivational calendar.

With that done, all that was left was a trip to the pub to relax after a good day’s work! :D

Thanks and kisses

I thank Tom for being a fantastic co-facilitator, and Chris for doing an excellent job of organising everything: food, refreshments, sponsorship, venue, my hotel last night, and probably a whole lot more that went so smoothly it was unnoticed.

Thank you very much indeed to the sponsors and supporters: epiGenesys, University of Sheffield Enterprise, O’Reilly UK and The GIST Foundation. It would have not been nearly as awesome without your help.

Thanks to all the people around the world who talked to us over Skype – it was great to feel part of something so much bigger than just us.

Thank you so very much to everybody who participated today. You really made it a great day for everyone.

Code Retreat in Winchester

All day today there was a Code Retreat at Eden Development. About 20 people came, from all over the country, and we spent an excellent Saturday pair programming together, sharing ideas, having stimulating conversations and getting to know each other much better.

At a code retreat everybody works on a single problem: Conway’s Game of Life. You pair with different people in each 45 minute session. You have to TDD the development, but you can use whichever programming language you choose as a pair. At the end of each session all the code must be deleted. You do a retrospective as a group, have a little break, then go and pair with somebody else.

We got through 6 sessions, which means i pair programmed with 6 people i didn’t know very well before today. It was great! The first two sessions i paired with Paul and then Quentin. To start with, we were pretty much feeling our way through the problem, implementing the rules of the game, and then getting stuck with determining the position of each cell.

In the third session i paired with Ben and we decided to try a completely different approach: dealing purely with coordinates to represent the positions of live cells. It actually worked quite nicely, although implementing the rule logic became quite difficult.

After lunch we were invited to try “TDD as if you mean it” which has very strict rules about where and when you should create your code, and when you can move it. It’s quite restricting the rules seemed to hold us back from getting very far. I was with Louis that time, who was very good at helping me to program in Java, which i’m not so familiar with.

At the 5th session we were allowed to just do whatever we want, so long as it was still test driven. I paired with Paweł and we just went a bit wild with linking cells to each other and getting them to link back respectively. We were going with North, South, East, West, but we eventually realised that you could really link any cell to any other, and the direction doesn’t matter. At that point it becomes more of a network problem. You could say that as a software coder i live or die depending on the community and people i know. That was an interesting insight.

In the final session I was with Clive and it turned out to be our best session of all. We were extremely controlled in our TDD, making sure we understood the code at each stage, and only taking small steps, and predicting at each test run whether it would pass or fail and what the failure message would be. We had cells that knew their positions, and could receive other cells and decide whether or not to attach to them as neighbours. Meaning we could pass every cell to every other cell and get them to connect based on their positions, then we could count how many neighbours they each have.

I mostly programmed in Ruby today, but there were people coding in Java, C++, C#, Python, and i think Scala, Clojure and PHP. We learnt a lot about how to program the game of life, and more importantly, how not to! A code retreat is a great opportunity to have fun, get to know other people, and code in an environment where it’s safe to try things out and make mistakes.

To find a code retreat near you, look on coderetreat.com or consider running your own!